Browsing Date

September 2015

Reproductive Endocrinology

Planned Attack on Women’s Reproductive Healthcare

September 30, 2015 • By

Yesterday, Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation, testified before Congress regarding the now-infamous doctored videos manufactured by anti-choice activists. (See:  and

You can watch the entire testimony here:

Despite the facts, Republican members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee continued their line of questioning as if the videos were factual. Their questioning also revealed such alarming ignorance of women’s healthcare, and the organizational structure and funding of Planned Parenthood, that one wonders whether they truly demonstrated an adequate level of decision-making capacity — a basic standard we demand from patients for informed decisions, which requires Understanding, Appreciation and Rationality. Most of the questions asked of Ms. Richards did not meet this standard, including one member asking her if she believed in “selling baby parts”— phrasing that demonstrates stunning levels of medical illiteracy and ignorance of the laws surrounding fetal tissue research (see:

The Chairman of the committee belligerently presented an inaccurate slide from a pro-life organization, claiming it came from Planned Parenthood (see: When Ms. Richards politely noted the source of the slide was from “Americans United for Life,” an anti-choice lobby, and assured the Chairman it was not accurate, he yielded the floor.

Any provider of women’s healthcare should be alarmed that funding for critical reproductive healthcare services are being debated by Congressional representatives who don’t seem to meet the same standards of decision-making capacity we would demand of patients or their surrogates. They do not understand or appreciate the facts of how Planned Parenthood is funded; what fetal tissue research is; or even, at minimum, that the videos in question are not authentic.  Further, they do not demonstrate rationality — an ability to reason with the information provided to them by Planned Parenthood.

The only thing that was clear about this “hearing” was that the Republicans were unable to listen.



Lessons About Death and Dying on 9/11

September 11, 2015 • By

On this 14th Anniversary of 9/11, healthcare providers of all disciplines should remember the lessons about death and dying on 9/11, elucidated in my 2013 paper: “The End-of-Life Experiences of 9/11 Civilians: Death and Dying in the World Trade Center.” (See:

The powerful lesson from those trapped and dying in the World Trade Center 14 years ago this morning was truth-telling. These tragic civilians still had decisions to make, and needed the truth so they could make decisions about where to die and how to die. In the North Tower, civilians who called emergency operators by dialing 9-1-1 were told: “Stay where you are”, which was a high-rise fire script that was completely inappropriate for what was unfolding on impact floors. Trapped civilians — who realized they were at the end of life —  made other decisions: they exercised their right to palliative approaches to an imminent death by breaking windows (when they were told not to) and jumping. Some made the choice to call loved ones and guarantee that their coordinates and circumstances were known. These were short calls, as time was short, with a consistent message: they told a loved one that they were trapped in a fire; they couldn’t get out; and they loved them.  Voicemails later became critical forensic evidence in deaths that were classified as homicides.

In the South Tower, hit second, but first to collapse, civilians had a close-up view to the horrors unfolding in the North Tower, and perceived their lives were threatened in the 16 minutes prior to their own tower being hit. Despite hearing an intercom message that their building “was secure” and to “return to your offices”, many made autonomous choices to self-evacuate and leave the building, saving themselves from being trapped on impact floors. Some made a different choice in those 16 minutes: they made “reassurance calls” to family members with a consistent message that they were in the “other building” (Tower 2), and they were safe.  Some of those calls delayed evacuation, but illustrate that connection and communication was a priority. Those in the South Tower who were trapped also made calls to 9-1-1 operators demanding to know whether firefighters would get to them in time as their environment deteriorated, but they were denied proper end-of-life dialogues. Instead of being asked by a skilled responder: “Is there someone I can call for you?” when callers explained they could no longer breathe, they were asked to spell their names, and even transferred or put on hold. This interfered with critical closure calls many would have made to family members instead of dying on hold with a 9-1-1 operator. Some callers simply called family and died on the phone with their loved ones. Several of these calls are available in the public record: (
and )

The lessons learned about death and dying on this terrible morning on September 11, 2001, are not new: they reinforce what end of life experts have known for over 40 years (See: Kubler-Ross, E., 1969 On Death and Dying. New York: Macmillan). People at the end of life want the truth so they can make choices about how to die and where to die.

In recent years, endocrinologists have found themselves in the position of needing to have end-of-life discussions. Especially those who deal with end-stage renal patients who are not transplant candidates, or patients with devastating diagnoses such as anaplastic thyroid cancer (See If you can’t tell the truth, reach out to a colleague who is expert in end-of-life dialogues so you can allow patients to make critical decisions. Trapped civilians who were in the towers teach us that even in the most imminent and dire circumstances, we can still make a myriad of end-of life decisions so long as we are told the truth.


The Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina: A Disaster for an ENT Surgeon

September 1, 2015 • By

Imagine learning that the surgeon who performed the total thyroidectomy on your thyroid cancer patient was being charged with homicide for deliberately euthanizing ICU patients ?

Ten years ago today (September 1, 2005), one ENT surgeon, Anna Pou, found herself in the eye of the storm’s crippling aftermath, and instead of relying on her surgical skills, was thrust into the role of having to make disaster ethics triage decisions for a group of very sick ICU patients – most of whom were ventilator-dependent, who had been stranded in Memorial hospital in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

Is this part of the training of an ENT surgeon? No. And that proved disastrous for Anna Pou, who had to endure, along with two of her colleagues, charges of homicide consequent to evidence of euthanasia. (She was never indicted, and the charges were eventually dropped.)

Here is the 60 Minutes clip which originally aired 9/24/06 chronicling the ordeal of Dr. Pou and her nurse colleagues:

In 2013, Sheri Fink’s Five Days at Memorial (See:, which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize, chronicled the events that went on at Memorial Hospital during the catastrophic flooding following Hurricane Katrina, in which 19th Century medicine needed to be practiced at the turn of the 21st Century.

Many of the same challenges played out again during Hurricane Sandy: (See, for example: and this:

What these events teach us is that Disaster Ethics has to be taught in medical schools and residency programs. We’re living in a time of climate change, a future of more powerful and frequent hurricanes (See:, combined with vulnerable infrastructures (see:

Every healthcare provider in training or practice today is at risk of being in the eye of a storm as weather will only get worse, and vulnerable populations will only increase. Weather is predicted to get far more severe, and hospitals will need to ride out hurricanes, flooding, tornadoes, blizzards, and ice storms. All of these weather systems can and wreak havoc on aging infrastructures, and knock out power, but the power grid itself is vulnerable even in the absence of extreme weather (see: and